Celebrities’ Narcisstic Twitter Obsession


By web gangsta | Published:

The British Gossip website HOLY MOLY has come up with their own CALCULATION TO DETERMINE A RATING FOR HOW NARCISSTIC A CELEBRITY IS BY USING TWITTER

When looking at a celebrity’s Twitter account, the celebrity is labeled as a “narcissitic tool” if they have more followers than they are following others.

The equation is

100-((100/# of followers) * # of following) 

Using this equation, here are the top 20, along with their Twitter Narcissism rating.  For those interested, Holy Moly has included a handy spreadsheet for you to see their full list, as well as add your own friends and family.

  1. Russell Brand (99.99%)
  2. Katy Perry (99.99%)
  3. Lily Allen (99.99%)
  4. Ashton Kutcher (99.98%)
  5. Chris Moyles (99.98%)
  6. Fred Durst (99.98%)
  7. Demi Moore (99.98%)
  8. Holly Willoughby (99.97%)
  9. Fearne Cotton (99.97%)
  10. Jamie Oliver (99.96%)
  11. P Diddy (99.96%)
  12. Perez Hilton (99.96%)
  13. Andi Peters (99.94%)
  14. Ryan Seacrest (99.94%)
  15. Eddie Izzard (99.93%)
  16. Charlie Brooker (99.91%)
  17. Graham Norton (99.90%)
  18. Paul Daniels (99.89%)
  19. Richard Bacon (99.89%)
  20. Matthew Horne (99.89%)

Talking about Ryan Seacrest’s #14 ranking, in a recent interview about celebrity Twitterers, SIMON COWELL SHARED HIS THOUGHTS ABOUT CELEBRITIES THAT TWITTER:

“Why would you want to talk to people like that? It’s like phoning someone randomly whose number you don’t even have and saying: ‘Hi, it’s Simon, I went out with my family this weekend’.”

Adding fuel to the narcissim Twitter fire, the Sunday Times interviewed psychologist Oliver James, who had THIS TO SAY ABOUT WHY PEOPLE TWITTER IN THE FIRST PLACE in a piece entitled “A Load of Twitter“:

“Twittering stems from a lack of identity. It’s a constant update of who you are, what you are, where you are. Nobody would Twitter if they had a strong sense of identity.”

In the same piece, cognitive neuropsychologist Dr David Lewis said this:

“Using Twitter suggests a level of insecurity whereby, unless people recognise you, you cease to exist. It may stave off insecurity in the short term, but it won’t cure it.”

Continuing in the Sunday Times article, author Alain de Botton said that Twitter represents…

“a way of making sure you are permanently connected to somebody and somebody is permanently connected to you, proving that you are alive. It’s like when a parent goes into a child’s room to check the child is still breathing. It is a giant baby monitor.”