What cities qualify to host the Super Bowl?


By web gangsta | Published:

Have you ever been to the Super Bowl?

The answer is probably going to be “likely not”, due to a number of reasons – not the least of which is how much money it can cost to purchase a single Super Bowl game ticket.

The Ultimate Super Bowl Book: A Complete Reference to the Stats, Stars, and Stories Behind Football's Biggest Game--and Why the Best Team Won
The Ultimate Super Bowl Book:
A Complete Reference to the Stats, Stars, and Stories Behind Football’s Biggest Game
— and Why the Best Team Won

And that’s not the least of your concerns.

Traveling to the host city, getting a hotel room, transportation, food – all of these can add up dramatically depending on where the game is being held.

But, if you’re lucky enough to live near an NFL franchise city – let’s say within a 2-hour drive or so – then you could eliminate all those intangible, unpredictable costs and focus solely on the game ticket and gameday parking to complete your bucket list goal of attending a Super Bowl game in person.

So how do you know if your local NFL CITY CAN HOST A SUPER BOWL?  It’s quite easy, actually.

Because not every city with an NFL franchise has the infrastructure available to host a Super Bowl and all of its associated events and activities.

To host a Super Bowl, a city must have the following:

  • a stadium that can seat a minimum of 70,000 fans and corporate sponsors
  • An average January outdoor temperature of at least 50 degrees… or a domed stadium.
  • At least 24,500 hotel rooms within one hour of the stadium
  • Up to 2 million square feet of convention space available for the NFL EXPERIENCE.
  • Even more available space for the SUPER BOWL VILLAGE.

Oh yeah – and the city that hosts the Super Bowl must also have an NFL team.

So here’s a question for Web Watch readers:  if you have to attend a Super Bowl, what city(s) would you most want to travel to in order to attend, and why?