Kickstarter? Yeah, your project sucks


By web gangsta | Published:

Raise your hand if you watch that awesome ABC program SHARK TANK.

For those of you who haven’t, here’s the show in a nutshell:

  • I have a cool product
  • Give me money
  • Profit!

Hacking Kickstarter, Indiegogo: How to Raise Big Bucks in 30 Days: Secrets to Running a Successful Crowd Funding Campaign on a Budget
Hacking Kickstarter, Indiegogo:
How to Raise Big Bucks in 30 Days:
Secrets to Running a Successful Crowd Funding Campaign on a Budget

Granted, not everybody who makes it onto Shark Tank have an awesome idea.  And then there’s the barrier to Shark Tank entry — there’s only a limited amount of time alloted, and only those inventions and ideas that have compelling presenters will really make it past the producers.

But why limit yourself to just the seven Sharks on the show?  Why not present your brilliant idea to the masses and hope that they can generate enough money for you to bring the product to market?

Heck, that’s what the Cards Against Humanity did, and look at how much you’re enjoying playing that game now, right?

So that’s what KICKSTARTER is for — and there are some really awesome items posted there that hopefully will eventually see the light of day.

But before you throw your hard-earned money at a Kickstarter project, maybe you should take a skeptical eye to what’s being presented.  Sure, you may get your money back if the project isn’t funded, or you may end up with a new Zoomie, which really wasn’t what you expected for your $50 investment.

That’s what the site DROP KICKER is all about.  Let Drop Kicker do the heavy lifting of taking a good, critical eye to the ideas that are presented on Kickstarter and let them decide if what you’re looking at is a scam or a dead product, and take their recommendation on whether you should spend money here.

Not all Kickstarter projects are scams. But those that are (or, at least smell like they could be, maybe, allegedly, perhaps)… let Drop Kicker be your guide.